Value of male remating and functional sterility in redback spiders

@article{Andrade2002ValueOM,
  title={Value of male remating and functional sterility in redback spiders},
  author={M. Andrade and E. Banta},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2002},
  volume={63},
  pages={857-870}
}
In the Australian redback spider, Latrodectus hasselti, males typically use their paired copulatory organs (palps) to copulate twice with a single female then sacrifice themselves to their cannibalistic mates in a strategy that increases their paternity in that one mating, but leads to death. [...] Key Result We show that, in the absence of sperm competition or cannibalism, male lifetime reproductive output is the same whether a male copulates once, twice, or several times with a given female. Repeated mating…Expand

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