Vaginal eroticism: A replication study

@article{Alzate1985VaginalEA,
  title={Vaginal eroticism: A replication study},
  author={Heli Alzate},
  journal={Archives of Sexual Behavior},
  year={1985},
  volume={14},
  pages={529-537}
}
  • H. Alzate
  • Published 1985
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Archives of Sexual Behavior
Vaginal eroticism was investigated in a group of 27 coitally experienced volunteers by means of systematic digital stimulation of both vaginal walls. Erogenous zones were found in all subjects, mainly located on the upper anterior wall and the lower posterior one. An orgasmic response was elicited by stimulation of these zones in 89% of the subjects.This study supports previous findings regarding vaginal eroticism. It does not support the existence of the discrete anatomical structure called… Expand
Vaginal eroticism and female orgasm: a current appraisal.
  • H. Alzate
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of sex & marital therapy
  • 1985
TLDR
It is concluded that most (and probably all) women possess vaginal zones, mainly located on the anterior wall, whose tactile stimulation can lead to orgasm, and confusion regarding the types of female orgasm is clarified. Expand
The G-spot: a modern gynecologic myth.
  • T. Hines
  • Medicine
  • American journal of obstetrics and gynecology
  • 2001
TLDR
The evidence is far too weak to support the reality of the G-spot, and anecdotal observations and case studies made on the basis of a tiny number of subjects are not supported by subsequent anatomic and biochemical studies. Expand
The "G spot" and "female ejaculation": a current appraisal.
TLDR
Evidence in support of the "G spot"--defined as a discrete anatomical structure located on the anterior vaginal wall, which swells upon being tactilely stimulated--is inconclusive, and, in the event of its existence, no evidence has been produced linking it to Skene's glands. Expand
The role of the Grafenberg Spot and female ejaculation in the female orgasmic response: an empirical analysis.
TLDR
A series of variables thought to be associated with perceptions of the Grafenberg Spot and its relationship, if any, to the female orgasmic response and female ejaculation were explored. Expand
Heart Rate Change as Evidence for Vaginally Elicited Orgasm and Orgasm Intensity
The purposes of this study were a) to further replicate previous findings on vaginal eroticism, using heart rate change as corroborative evidence for the subjective perception of sexual arousal andExpand
Female orgasm: Myths, facts and controversies
Summary In this article, we propose a review of data from scientific, anatomic, physiological and clinical literature, combined with sociological and historic data, with a view to providing aExpand
Female orgasm(s): one, two, several.
TLDR
The assumption that women may experience only the clitoral, external orgasm is not based on the best available scientific evidence. Expand
Anatomy of the Vulva and the Female Sexual Response.
  • J. Yeung, R. Pauls
  • Medicine
  • Obstetrics and gynecology clinics of North America
  • 2016
TLDR
The female vulva is an intricate structure comprising several components, commonly known as the clitoris, which is widely accepted as the most critical anatomic structure to female sexual arousal and orgasm. Expand
Vaginal sensitivity to electric stimuli: Theoretical and practical implications
TLDR
The study provides data underscoring previous anatomical and clinical research findings regarding the sensitivity of the anterior vaginal wall and the inefficiency of coitus for inducing female orgasm. Expand
A proposal for a radical new sex therapy technique for the management of vasocongestive and orgasmic dysfunction in women: The AFE Zone Stimulation Technique
TLDR
Stimulation of the AFE Zone, the erogenous centre in the inner half of the anterior wall of the vagina, results in rapid onset of reflex vaginal lubrication and build-up of erotic sensitivity, culminating in orgasms in some cases. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 25 REFERENCES
Vaginal erotic sensitivity.
TLDR
Findings indicate that the vagina of most women has a zone (or zones) of erotic sensitivity whose appropriate stimulation can lead to orgasm; it does not support, however, the particular location and characteristics of the vaginal erogenous zone described by other authors. Expand
Female ejaculation: A case study
Abstract This case study provides objective evidence supporting the hypothesis that female ejaculation, a partial, infertile homologue of male ejaculation, exists. A karyotypically normal,Expand
The Sensory Arm of the Female Organsmic Reflex
ABSTRACTThe sexological examination of the female patient has proved to be, in our experience, an essential and almost indispensable diagnostic and therapeutic aid for the treatment of female sexualExpand
The Grafenberg spot and female ejaculation: a review of initial hypotheses.
TLDR
Gynecologists found an area similar to other descriptions of the Grafenberg Spot in four of the 11 women and Examination of the ejaculate of six women failed to detect elevated levels of prostatic acid phosphatase and the substance appeared similar in biochemical properties to urine. Expand
Pelvic muscle strength of female ejaculators: Evidence in support of a new theory of orgasm
Abstract Kegel's theory (1952a) concerning the sexual importance of the pubococ‐cygeus muscle was combined with Singer's theory (1973) of “uterine” orgasms to produce the hypothesis that women whoExpand
From masturbation to orgasm with a partner: How some women bridge the gap—and why others don't
Abstract How do women bridge the gap between their masturbatory experience and sex with a partner? The results of a magazine questionnaire among young Dutch women indicate specific relationshipsExpand
An evaluation of sexual performance--comparison between sexually dysfunctional and functional couples.
TLDR
It was found that men are very concerned with partner satisfaction and are the primary initiators for therapy, and characterized by "gender asymmetry" in all aspects of sexual activity. Expand
Frequency of sexual dysfunction in "normal" couples.
In analyzing the responses of 100 predominantly white, well educated and happily married couples to a self-report questionnaire, this study examined the frequency of sexual problems experienced andExpand
...
1
2
3
...