Vacuolating cytotoxin of Helicobacter pylori plays a role during colonization in a mouse model of infection.

@article{Salama2001VacuolatingCO,
  title={Vacuolating cytotoxin of Helicobacter pylori plays a role during colonization in a mouse model of infection.},
  author={Nina R Salama and Genevieve Otto and Laurie Tompkins and Stanley Falkow},
  journal={Infection and immunity},
  year={2001},
  volume={69 2},
  pages={730-6}
}
Helicobacter pylori, the causative agent of gastritis and ulcer disease in humans, secretes a toxin called VacA (vacuolating cytotoxin) into culture supernatants. VacA was initially characterized and purified on the basis of its ability to induce the formation of intracellular vacuoles in tissue culture cells. H. pylori strains possessing different alleles of vacA differ in their ability to express active toxin. Those strains expressing higher toxin levels are correlated with more severe… CONTINUE READING