Vaccination with Dukoral® against travelers’ diarrhea (ETEC) and cholera

@article{Jelinek2008VaccinationWD,
  title={Vaccination with Dukoral{\textregistered} against travelers’ diarrhea (ETEC) and cholera},
  author={T. Jelinek and H. Kollaritsch},
  journal={Expert Review of Vaccines},
  year={2008},
  volume={7},
  pages={561 - 567}
}
There is currently only one vaccine available that provides protection against diarrhea caused by Vibrio cholerae and, to a lesser degree, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). Adverse events of this oral whole-cell/recombinant B-subunit vaccine have been negligible. Protective efficacy against cholera is 85%, while protection against the heat-labile toxin of ETEC reaches 67%. There is still a need for data on protection of Western travelers against travelers’ diarrhea in general by Dukoral… Expand
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