VI. On the structure of certain limestone nodules enclosed in seams of bituminous coal, with a description of some trigonocarpons contained in them

@article{HookerVIOT,
  title={VI. On the structure of certain limestone nodules enclosed in seams of bituminous coal, with a description of some trigonocarpons contained in them},
  author={Joseph Dalton Sir Hooker and Edward William Binney},
  journal={Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London},
  pages={149 - 156}
}
The specimens of plants which we are about to describe were found imbedded in nodules of limestone, enclosed in a thin seam of bituminous coal not above 6 inches thick, in the lower part of the Lancashire coal-field. Their relative position is best understood from the following section (in a descending order). 1. Black shales containing Avicula papyracea, Goniatites Listen, Orthoceras attenuatum and other Mollusca, apparently of marine origin. 2. Bituminous coal enclosing a horizontal layer of… 
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