Using the ventrologluteal site for intramuscular injection.

@article{Greenway2004UsingTV,
  title={Using the ventrologluteal site for intramuscular injection.},
  author={Kathleen Greenway},
  journal={Nursing standard (Royal College of Nursing (Great Britain) : 1987)},
  year={2004},
  volume={18 25},
  pages={
          39-42
        }
}
  • Kathleen Greenway
  • Published 3 March 2004
  • Medicine
  • Nursing standard (Royal College of Nursing (Great Britain) : 1987)
The administration of intramuscular injections is a common nursing intervention in clinical practice. This article aims to raise awareness of the use of the ventrogluteal site for administering intramuscular injections. It describes the main reasons for using this site and outlines the complications associated with the dorsogluteal site. It is hoped that this review of the literature will shift everyday practice in favour of the ventrogluteal site. 

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