Using social psychology to motivate contributions to online communities

@article{Beenen2004UsingSP,
  title={Using social psychology to motivate contributions to online communities},
  author={Gerard Beenen and Kimberly S. Ling and Xiaoqing Wang and Klarissa Ting-Ting Chang and Dan Frankowski and Paul Resnick and Robert E. Kraut},
  journal={Proceedings of the 2004 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work},
  year={2004}
}
Under-contribution is a problem for many online communities. Social psychology theories of social loafing and goal-setting can provide mid-level design principles to address this problem. We tested the design principles in two field experiments. In one, members of an online movie recommender community were reminded of the uniqueness of their contributions and the benefits that follow from them. In the second, they were given a range of individual or group goals for contribution. As predicted by… 

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