Using linkage models to explore skull kinematic diversity and functional convergence in arthrodire placoderms

@article{Anderson2010UsingLM,
  title={Using linkage models to explore skull kinematic diversity and functional convergence in arthrodire placoderms},
  author={Philip S. L. Anderson},
  journal={Journal of Morphology},
  year={2010},
  volume={271}
}
  • P. Anderson
  • Published 2010
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of Morphology
Biomechanical models offer a powerful set of tools for quantifying the diversity of function across fossil taxa. A computer‐based four‐bar linkage model previously developed to describe the potential feeding kinematics of Dunkleosteus terrelli is applied here to several other arthrodire placoderm taxa from different lineages. Arthrodire placoderms are a group of basal gnathostomes showing one of the earliest diversifications of jaw structures. The linkage model allows biomechanical variation to… Expand
Linkage mechanisms in the vertebrate skull: Structure and function of three‐dimensional, parallel transmission systems
TLDR
New, three‐dimensional (3D), parallel linkage models of the skulls of birds and fishes are presented and used to investigate structure–function relationships in these systems, enabling novel interpretations of the mechanics of force transmission across a diversity of vertebrate feeding mechanisms and enhancing the understanding of musculoskeletal function and evolution. Expand
Reevaluating Musculoskeletal Linkages in Suction-Feeding Fishes with X-Ray Reconstruction of Moving Morphology (XROMM).
TLDR
The XROMM results support the role of cranial muscles in controlling and transmitting power from the axial muscles, rather than generating substantial power themselves, in suction-feeding fishes. Expand
Reevaluating Musculoskeletal Linkages in Suction-Feeding Fishes with X-Ray Reconstruction of Moving Morphology (XROMM).
TLDR
The results support the role of cranial muscles in controlling and transmitting power from the axial muscles, rather than generating substantial power themselves, in suction-feeding fishes. Expand
Common evolutionary trends underlie the four‐bar linkage systems of sunfish and mantis shrimp
TLDR
This work built dynamic linkage models of 19 centrarchid and 36 stomatopod species and used phylogenetic generalized least squares regression (PGLS) to compare evolutionary shifts in linkage morphology and mechanical outputs derived from the models, illustrating the potential influence of physical principles on morphological evolution across biological systems with different structures, behaviors, and ecologies. Expand
The Cleveland Museum of Natural History Month 2009 Number 57 : 000 – 000 FUNCTIONAL AND ONTOGENETIC IMPLICATIONS OF BITE STRESS IN ARTHRODIRE
Arthrodires were predatory vertebrates of the Devonian seas, with simple lower jaws conducible to examination of feeding across growth, evolution, and local diversity. 2D finite element analysesExpand
What fish can teach us about the feeding functions of postcranial muscles and joints.
  • A. L. Camp
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Integrative and comparative biology
  • 2019
TLDR
The anatomy and motion of the head-body interface in ray-finned fishes is used to develop a mechanical framework for studying postcranial functions during feeding, which can be used to examine the role of the postc Cranio-vertebral interface in other vertebrate groups, and how that role changes with morphology and feeding behaviors. Expand
Mechanical sensitivity reveals evolutionary dynamics of mechanical systems
  • P. Anderson, S. Patek
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
  • 2015
TLDR
Examining the diversification of a four-bar linkage system in mantis shrimp (Stomatopoda) found evidence for both mechanical equivalence and differential mechanical sensitivity, illustrating the importance of multi-level analyses in delineating the factors that limit and promote diversification in form–function systems. Expand
In Vivo Measurement of Mesokinesis in Gekko gecko: The Role of Cranial Kinesis during Gape Display, Feeding and Biting
TLDR
X-ray Reconstruction Of Moving Morphology is used to further quantify mesokinesis in vivo in Gekko gecko during three routine behaviors: gape display, biting and post-ingestion feeding, which demonstrates that mesokineis is a key component of defensive biting and gAPE display behaviors, as well as post-in vivo feeding, all of which are linked to organismal fitness. Expand
A large Middle Devonian eubrachythoracid ‘placoderm’ (Arthrodira) jaw from northern Gondwana
TLDR
A large tooth-bearing jaw element of Leptodontichthys ziregensis gen. et sp. Expand
Feeding ecology of the deep‐bodied fish Dapedium (Actinopterygii, Neopterygii) from the Sinemurian of Dorset, England
TLDR
The analysis of the functional morphology of Dapedium, in combination with its jaw anatomy and dentition, indicates that the genus was well adapted to a durophagous feeding habit, although indirect evidence suggests a more generalist feeding mode. Expand
...
1
2
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 80 REFERENCES
A biomechanical model of feeding kinematics for Dunkleosteus terrelli (Arthrodira, Placodermi)
TLDR
Detailed computational modeling of the four-bar linkage mechanism in the skull and jaw systems of Dunkleosteus terrelli shows a high speed transmission for jaw opening, producing a rapid expansion phase similar to that in modern fishes that use suction during prey capture. Expand
Evolution of Levers and Linkages in the Feeding Mechanisms of Fishes1
  • M. Westneat
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Integrative and comparative biology
  • 2004
TLDR
This study examines the diversity of mechanical design of the oral jaws in 35 species of ray-finned fishes to analyze lower jaw lever models in a broad phylogenetic range of taxa and identify the origin and evolutionary patterns of change in the linkage systems that power maxillary rotation and upper jaw protrusion. Expand
Feeding mechanics and bite force modelling of the skull of Dunkleosteus terrelli, an ancient apex predator
TLDR
A biomechanical model of force and motion during feeding in Dunkleosteus terrelli reveals a highly kinetic skull driven by a unique four-bar linkage mechanism that is among the most powerful bites in animals. Expand
Four‐bar linkage modelling in teleost pharyngeal jaws: computer simulations of bite kinetics
TLDR
Pharyngeal linkage modelling enables quantitative functional morphometry of a key component of the fish feeding system, and the model is now available for ontogenetic and comparative analyses of fishes with pharyngeAL linkage mechanisms. Expand
EVOLUTIONARY DYNAMICS OF COMPLEX BIOMECHANICAL SYSTEMS: AN EXAMPLE USING THE FOUR‐BAR MECHANISM
TLDR
It is suggested that partial decoupling of morphology and mechanics due to redundancy is a major factor in morphological diversification. Expand
Evolution of hindlimb posture in nonmammalian therapsids: biomechanical tests of paleontological hypotheses
TLDR
A biomechanical model is derived to test the hypothesis that the use of multiple postures was ancestral to the more upright posture typical of most mammals, and indicates that the axial rotation of the femur typical in sprawling locomotion can reduce peak bending stresses. Expand
Skull Biomechanics and Suction Feeding in Fishes
TLDR
The basic morphological structure of fish skulls is presented, the principles of musculoskeletal biomechanics that transfer force and motion in fish feeding systems are identified, and modifications of the basic pattern of prey capture that characterize some of the primary feeding modes in fishes are illustrated. Expand
Comparative and developmental functional morphology of the jaws of living and fossil gars (Actinopterygii: Lepisosteidae)
TLDR
Principal components analysis of functionally important morphometrics shows that several gar species occupy different regions of functional morphospace, although gars occupy a range of biomechanical states across the continuum of force vs. velocity transmission. Expand
Transmission of force and velocity in the feeding mechanisms of labrid fishes (Teleostei, Perciformes)
TLDR
The feeding mechanisms of four species of the teleostean family Labridae were modeled using four-bar linkage theory from mechanical engineering to calculate the capacity for transmission of force and velocity in musculoskeletal systems. Expand
Evolutionary Consequences of Many‐to‐One Mapping of Jaw Morphology to Mechanics in Labrid Fishes
TLDR
It is shown that labrid jaws are subject to many‐to-one mapping of form‐to‐jaw mechanical properties but that some mechanical types have higher levels of morphological redundancy than others, which has affected the diversity and distribution of labrid jaw shapes. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...