Using lightweight modeling to understand chord

@article{Zave2012UsingLM,
  title={Using lightweight modeling to understand chord},
  author={Pamela Zave},
  journal={Comput. Commun. Rev.},
  year={2012},
  volume={42},
  pages={49-57}
}
  • P. Zave
  • Published 29 March 2012
  • Computer Science
  • Comput. Commun. Rev.
Correctness of the Chord ring-maintenance protocol would mean that the protocol can eventually repair all disruptions in the ring structure, given ample time and no further disruptions while it is working. In other words, it is "eventual reachability." Under the same assumptions about failure behavior as made in the Chord papers, no published version of Chord is correct. This result is based on modeling the protocol in Alloy and analyzing it with the Alloy Analyzer. By combining the right… 

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