Using historical accounts to set conservation baselines: the case of Lynx species in Spain

@article{Clavero2013UsingHA,
  title={Using historical accounts to set conservation baselines: the case of Lynx species in Spain},
  author={Miguel Clavero and Miguel Delibes},
  journal={Biodiversity and Conservation},
  year={2013},
  volume={22},
  pages={1691-1702}
}
The knowledge of the historical range of organisms is necessary to understand distribution dynamics and their drivers as well as to set reference conditions and conservation goals. We reviewed written sources documenting the presence of lynxes in Spain between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries, trying to infer whether Lynx records referred to the Iberian (Lynx pardinus) or the Eurasian (Lynx lynx) species. We compiled 151 spatially specific, non-redundant Lynx records, dating between 1572… 

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