Using diffusion imaging to study human connectional anatomy.

@article{JohansenBerg2009UsingDI,
  title={Using diffusion imaging to study human connectional anatomy.},
  author={Heidi Johansen-Berg and Matthew F. S. Rushworth},
  journal={Annual review of neuroscience},
  year={2009},
  volume={32},
  pages={
          75-94
        }
}
Diffusion imaging can be used to estimate the routes taken by fiber pathways connecting different regions of the living brain. This approach has already supplied novel insights into in vivo human brain anatomy. For example, by detecting where connection patterns change, one can define anatomical borders between cortical regions or subcortical nuclei in the living human brain for the first time. Because diffusion tractography is a relatively new technique, however, it is important to assess its… 

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