Using citizen science to monitor Bombus populations in the UK: nesting ecology and relative abundance in the urban environment

@article{Lye2011UsingCS,
  title={Using citizen science to monitor Bombus populations in the UK: nesting ecology and relative abundance in the urban environment},
  author={Gillian C. Lye and Juliet L. Osborne and Kirsty J. Park and Dave Goulson},
  journal={Journal of Insect Conservation},
  year={2011},
  volume={16},
  pages={697-707}
}
Citizen science can provide a valuable tool for collecting large quantities of ecological data over a larger geographic area than would otherwise be possible. Here, data were collected on 1,022 bumblebee nests by means of a public survey in which participants were asked to record attributes of bumblebee nests discovered in their gardens. All commonly reported species appeared to be generalist in their nest site selection and though species-specific differences in nest site choice were evident… Expand

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