Using Stable Hydrogen Isotope Analysis of Feathers to Delineate Origins of Harvested Sandhill Cranes in the Central Flyway of North America

@inproceedings{Hobson2006UsingSH,
  title={Using Stable Hydrogen Isotope Analysis of Feathers to Delineate Origins of Harvested Sandhill Cranes in the Central Flyway of North America},
  author={Keith A. Hobson and Steven L Van Wilgenburg and Leonard I. Wassenaar and Helen M. Hands and William P. Johnson and M. E. O'Meilia and Philip Taylor},
  year={2006}
}
Abstract Assignment and quantification of breeding production areas of migratory birds is a crucial step in understanding their population dynamics and informing conservation and management decisions, especially for game birds. Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis) breed throughout the North American boreal, taiga, and non-forested regions of the Arctic and Siberia. Birds harvested in North America originate from these remote northern regions but conventional mark-recapture techniques cannot… 

Origins of juvenile Woodcock (Scolopax rusticola) harvested in Spain inferred from stable hydrogen isotope (δ2H) analyses of feathers

AbstractWoodcock (Scolopax rusticola) are heavily hunted in south-central Europe during the winter and have been the focus of intense management efforts and concern. One of the significant challenges

Lack of Stable-Isotope Differences Between Canada Goose Populations Nesting in the Subarctic and Temperate Zones

Canadian Geese nesting in the temperate zone and the subarctic have limited ability to discriminate between subspecies interior and maxima and hence have limited applicability for estimating the origin of harvested birds and/or identifying molt migrants of maxima.

Shorebird hunting in Barbados: Using stable isotopes to link the harvest at a migratory stopover site with sources of production

ABSTRACT Understanding spatial connectivity of long-distance migrants is important for effective management and conservation of both game and nongame species. Hunting of Nearctic-breeding shorebirds

A Method for Investigating Population Declines of Migratory Birds Using Stable Isotopes: Origins of Harvested Lesser Scaup in North America

Hydrogen isotopes were used to determine natal origins of migrating hatch-year lesser scaup harvested by hunters in the United States from all North American flyways during the hunting seasons of 1999–2000 and 2000–2001, suggesting that despite having a higher relative abundance of breeding adults, the northern boreal region was less productive for scauP recruitment into the harvest than more southern biomes.

Linking Canadian Harvested Juvenile American Black Ducks to Their Natal Areas Using Stable Isotope (δD, δ13C, and δ15N) Methods

The work shows that the geographic origins, landscape, and habitat associations of hatch-year Black Ducks can be inferred using this technique and it is recommended that a broad-scale isotopic study using a large sample of Canadian and US harvested birds be implemented to provide a continental perspective of source-sink population dynamics.

Tracing origins of waterfowl using the Saskatchewan River Delta: Incorporating stable isotope approaches in continent-wide waterfowl management and conservation

ABSTRACT Understanding the catchment areas of key stopover sites for migratory birds is important for their management and conservation. The Saskatchewan River Delta (SRD) in central Canada is North

ESTIMATING ORIGINS OF THREE SPECIES OF NEOTROPICAL MIGRANT SONGBIRDS AT A GULF COAST STOPOVER SITE: COMBINING STABLE ISOTOPE AND GIS TOOLS

Abstract Measurement of stable-hydrogen isotopes (δD) in feathers of migrating birds can provide information on where feathers were grown in North America, at least to an approximate band of

Stable isotopes (δD) delineate the origins and migratory connectivity of harvested animals: the case of European woodpigeons

Summary 1. Quantifying connectivity between breeding, stopover, and wintering locations is critical to the management and conservation of migratory animals. Mark‐recapture approaches to establishing

Assessing dispersal in threatened migratory birds using stable hydrogen isotope (δD) analysis of feathers

This work augmented the GNIP dataset with information from the US Network for Isotopes in Precipitation database for sites in the Great Plains, refining a previously published isoscape for inferring origins of migratory wildlife.

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