Using Biogeography to Help Set Priorities in Marine Conservation

@inproceedings{Lourie2004UsingBT,
  title={Using Biogeography to Help Set Priorities in Marine Conservation},
  author={Sara A. Lourie and Amanda C. J. Vincent},
  year={2004}
}
: Biogeographic information has great potential to enhance systematic conservation planning, although it has yet to be routinely incorporated in marine situations. Fundamental differences between marine and terrestrial environments (physical, biological, and sociopolitical) mean that biogeographic data are harder to obtain for marine systems, biogeographic boundaries more difficult to define, and the outcomes of similar conservation approaches may differ. Despite these challenges, an… CONTINUE READING

Tables from this paper.

Citations

Publications citing this paper.
SHOWING 1-10 OF 69 CITATIONS

FILTER CITATIONS BY YEAR

2004
2019

CITATION STATISTICS

  • 4 Highly Influenced Citations

References

Publications referenced by this paper.
SHOWING 1-10 OF 86 REFERENCES

The representative areas program: protecting the biodiversity of the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area. Pages 687–696 in Proceedings of the ninth international coral reef symposium

J. Day, L. Fernandes, +7 authors J. Oliver
  • Indonesian Institute of Sciences,
  • 2003
VIEW 7 EXCERPTS
HIGHLY INFLUENTIAL

The sea around: planning in marine regions

M. W. Beck
  • Pages 319–344 in C. R. Groves, editor. Drafting a conservation blueprint: a practitioner’s guide to planning for biodiversity. Island Press, Washington D.C.
  • 2003
VIEW 6 EXCERPTS
HIGHLY INFLUENTIAL

Sources, sinks and the design of marine reserve networks

C. M. Roberts
  • Fisheries 23:16–19.
  • 1998
VIEW 3 EXCERPTS
HIGHLY INFLUENTIAL

2003 not yet completed, satellite images and ground truthing

Day
  • 2003

America’s living oceans: charting a course for sea change

Pew Oceans Commission.
  • Pew Oceans Commission, Washington, D.C.
  • 2003