Uses of research evidence in the state legislative process to promote active environments in Minnesota.

Abstract

PURPOSE To describe how research evidence and non-research-based information are used in testimony and other legislative documents used in arguments for and against physical activity-related bills in Minnesota. DESIGN Content analysis. SETTING Documents and oral testimony archived by the Minnesota State Legislature from 2007 to 2011. SUBJECTS Not applicable. MEASURES A coding instrument was developed to measure descriptive features of materials (e.g., length, document type) and the presence or absence of certain types of research evidence and non-research-based information. ANALYSIS Frequencies of variables and measures of associations using Pearson χ (2) tests. RESULTS Over a third (36%) of the sample contained research evidence, and 88% of the sample contained non-research-based information. Compared to materials related to physical activity, materials related to built environment were significantly less likely to reference research evidence. CONCLUSION Despite an abundance of evidence, research evidence was present in only about one-third of the sample. There may be opportunities during legislative discussions on the built environment for obesity-related data to help make the case for sound policies.

DOI: 10.4278/ajhp.130430-ARB-217

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Cite this paper

@article{Kite2014UsesOR, title={Uses of research evidence in the state legislative process to promote active environments in Minnesota.}, author={Hanna A Kite and Sarah Elizabeth Gollust and Rachel A Callanan and Susan R Weisman and Sara J Benning and Marilyn S. Nanney}, journal={American journal of health promotion : AJHP}, year={2014}, volume={28 3 Suppl}, pages={S44-6} }