Users' Privacy Concerns About Wearables - Impact of Form Factor, Sensors and Type of Data Collected

@inproceedings{Motti2015UsersPC,
  title={Users' Privacy Concerns About Wearables - Impact of Form Factor, Sensors and Type of Data Collected},
  author={Vivian Genaro Motti and Kelly E. Caine},
  booktitle={Financial Cryptography Workshops},
  year={2015}
}
Wearables have become popular in several application domains, including healthcare, entertainment and security. [] Key Result Our results show that users have different levels and types of privacy concerns depending on the type of wearable they use. By better understanding the users’ perspectives about wearable privacy, we aim at helping designers and researchers to develop effective solutions to create privacy-enhanced wearables.
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