Use of voltage-sensitive dyes and optical recordings in the central nervous system

@article{Ebner1995UseOV,
  title={Use of voltage-sensitive dyes and optical recordings in the central nervous system},
  author={Timothy J. Ebner and Gang Chen},
  journal={Progress in Neurobiology},
  year={1995},
  volume={46},
  pages={463-506}
}

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