Use of vision in prey detection by brown long-eared bats, Plecotus auritus

@article{Eklf2003UseOV,
  title={Use of vision in prey detection by brown long-eared bats, Plecotus auritus
},
  author={Johan S. Ekl{\"o}f and Gareth Jones},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2003},
  volume={66},
  pages={949-953}
}
Abstract We investigated the ability of brown long-eared bats to make use of visual cues when searching for food. By using petri dishes containing mealworms that were subjected to different levels of illumination, we presented four bats with different sensory cues: visual, sonar and a combination of these. The bats preferred situations where both sonar cues and visual cues were available, and the visual information was more important than the sonar cues. The bats did, however, emit echolocation… 
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