Use of the non-pneumatic anti-shock garment (NASG) to reduce blood loss and time to recovery from shock for women with obstetric haemorrhage in Egypt

@article{Miller2007UseOT,
  title={Use of the non-pneumatic anti-shock garment (NASG) to reduce blood loss and time to recovery from shock for women with obstetric haemorrhage in Egypt},
  author={S. Miller and J. Turan and K. Dau and M. Fathalla and M. Mourad and T. Sutherland and S. Hamza and F. Lester and E. B. Gibson and R. Gipson and K. Nada and P. Hensleigh},
  journal={Global Public Health},
  year={2007},
  volume={2},
  pages={110 - 124}
}
Abstract Obstetric haemorrhage is one of the leading causes of maternal mortality. In many low-resource settings, delays in transport to referral facilities and in obtaining lifesaving treatment, contribute to maternal deaths. The non-pneumatic anti-shock garment (NASG) is a low-technology pressure device that decreases blood loss, restores vital signs, and has the potential to improve adverse outcomes by helping women survive delays in receiving adequate emergency obstetric care. With brief… Expand

Paper Mentions

Interventional Clinical Trial
This trial will address the question of whether early application of the Non-pneumatic Anti-Shock Garment (NASG) at the Satellite Health Facility (SHF) level before transport to a… Expand
ConditionsHemorrhage, Hypovolemic Shock
InterventionDevice
Interventional Clinical Trial
This study will test the efficacy of the NASG on women suffering from obstetric hemorrhage as compared to hemorrhaging women who do not receive the NASG.  
ConditionsHemorrhage, Hypovolemic Shock
InterventionDevice
Can the Non-pneumatic Anti-Shock Garment (NASG) reduce adverse maternal outcomes from postpartum hemorrhage? Evidence from Egypt and Nigeria
TLDR
The NASG showed promise for reducing blood loss, emergency hysterectomy, morbidity and mortality associated with PPH in referral facilities in Egypt and Nigeria and in a multiple logistic regression model. Expand
Obstetric hemorrhage and shock management: using the low technology Non-pneumatic Anti-Shock Garment in Nigerian and Egyptian tertiary care facilities
TLDR
Adding the NASG to standard shock and hemorrhage management may significantly improve maternal outcomes from hypovolemic shock secondary to obstetric hemorrhage at tertiary care facilities in low-resource settings. Expand
Title Can the Non-pneumatic Anti-Shock Garment ( NASG ) reduce adverse maternal outcomes from postpartum hemorrhage ? Evidence from Egypt and Nigeria Permalink
Background: Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is the leading cause of maternal mortality and severe maternal morbidity. The Non-pneumatic Anti-Shock Garment (NASG), a first-aid lower-body compressionExpand
Title Obstetric Hemorrhage and Shock Management : Using the Low Technology Non-pneumatic Anti-Shock Garment in Nigerian and Egyptian Tertiary Care Facilities Permalink
Background: Obstetric hemorrhage is the leading cause of maternal mortality globally. The Non-pneumatic AntiShock Garment (NASG) is a low-technology, first-aid compression device which, when added toExpand
Effectiveness of Non-pneumatic Anti-shock Garment (NASG) in Preventing Shock-related Morbidity and Mortality in Severe Hemorrhagic Shock
TLDR
This reappraisal has confirmed the effectiveness of NASG in preventing shock-related morbidity and complications during obstetric delays and recommended that it should be available in every childbirth center. Expand
Non-Pneumatic Anti-Shock Garment (NASG), a First-Aid Device to Decrease Maternal Mortality from Obstetric Hemorrhage: A Cluster Randomized Trial
TLDR
Despite a lack of statistical significance, the 54% reduced odds of EAO and the significantly faster shock recovery suggest there might be treatment benefits from earlier application of the NASG for women experiencing delays obtaining definitive treatment for hypovolemic shock. Expand
Anti-shock garment in postpartum haemorrhage.
TLDR
The only evidence available about NASGs for obstetric haemorrhage - two pre-post pilot trials and three case series - are discussed and recently initiated randomized cluster trials in Africa are described. Expand
The non-pneumatic anti-shock garment for postpartum haemorrhage in nigeria
TLDR
The NASG shows promise for reducing blood loss and mortality from uterine atony in women who suffered obstetric haemorrhage and a subset of women with aetiology of post-partum uterineAtony were examined. Expand
The Mechanisms of Action of the Non-Pneumatic Anti-Shock Garment
TLDR
The work presented in this chapter is preliminary and far from complete, but it represents a thorough discussion of the ongoing efforts at obtaining a better understanding of how the NASG affects human physiology, particularly that of the pregnant/postpartum woman. Expand
Assessing the Role of the Non-Pneumatic Anti-Shock Garment in Reducing Mortality from Postpartum Hemorrhage in Nigeria
TLDR
The non-pneumatic anti-shock garment (NASG), a first-aid lower-body pressure device, shows promise for reducing mortality from PPH in referral facilities in Nigeria. Expand
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New strategies to prevent and manage postpartum hemorrhage in developing countries, such as community-based use of misoprostol, oxytocin in the Uniject delivery system, the non-inflatable antishock garment to stabilize and resuscitate hypovolemic shock, and the balloon condom catheter to treat intractable uterine bleeding are reviewed. Expand
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Objective  To compare the effect of non‐pneumatic anti‐shock garment (NASG) on blood loss from obstetric haemorrhage with standard management of obstetric haemorrhage.
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