Use of the Walnut Digital Signature Algorithm with CBOR Object Signing and Encryption (COSE)

@article{Atkins2021UseOT,
  title={Use of the Walnut Digital Signature Algorithm with CBOR Object Signing and Encryption (COSE)},
  author={Derek Atkins},
  journal={RFC},
  year={2021},
  volume={9021},
  pages={1-11}
}
This document specifies the conventions for using the Walnut Digital Signature Algorithm (WalnutDSA) for digital signatures with the CBOR Object Signing and Encryption (COSE) syntax. WalnutDSA is a lightweight, quantum-resistant signature scheme based on Group Theoretic Cryptography (see [WALNUTDSA] and [WALNUTSPEC]) with implementation and computational efficiency of signature verification in constrained environments, even on 8- and 16-bit platforms. 
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TLDR
This specification describes how to create and process signatures, message authentication codes, and encryption using CBOR for serialization, and the conventions for the use of a number of cryptographic algorithms with COSE.

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