Use of the Pediatric Symptom Checklist in a low-income, Mexican American population.

@article{Jutte2003UseOT,
  title={Use of the Pediatric Symptom Checklist in a low-income, Mexican American population.},
  author={Douglas P. Jutte and Anthony E. Burgos and Fernando S. Mendoza and Christine Blasey Ford and Lynne C. Huffman},
  journal={Archives of pediatrics \& adolescent medicine},
  year={2003},
  volume={157 12},
  pages={
          1169-76
        }
}
OBJECTIVE To evaluate the usefulness of the Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC) in identifying behavioral problems in low-income, Mexican American children. DESIGN A cross-sectional study design was used to examine the PSC as a screening test, with the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) as the criterion standard. SETTING The study was conducted at a health center in a diverse low-income community. Patients Eligible patients were children and adolescents, 4 to 16 years of age, who were seen for… 

Tables from this paper

Psychometric evaluation of the Turkish version of the Pediatric Symptom Checklist-17 for detecting psychosocial problems in low-income children.
TLDR
The Turkish version of the Pediatric Symptom Checklist-17 showed an adequate reliability and validity for its use in low-income, Turkish children and provided an empirical support for extending the use of this easy-to-use tool in the primary care settings.
Sensitivity and specificity of the pictorial Pediatric Symptom Checklist for psychosocial problem detection in a Mexican sample.
TLDR
Questionnaires that include pictorial descriptions may be valuable for improvements of health screening in communities with low education levels, and improved sensitivity and specificity were achieved when the threshold for clinical follow-up was lowered from 28 to 22 points.
Screening Mexicans for psychosocial and behavioral problems during pediatric consultation.
TLDR
The PPSC is a simple, effective tool that can detect on average more than 65% of the children and adolescents with possible psychosocial problems during pediatric consultations, and may be also effective for Mexican children living in Mexico.
Use of the Pediatric Symptom Checklist for the detection of psychosocial problems in preventive child healthcare
TLDR
The Dutch version of the US Pediatric Symptom checklist (PSC) is valid and suitable for the early detection of psychosocial problems among children, especially with an adjusted cut-off.
The predictive value of the pediatric symptom checklist in 5-year-old Austrian children
TLDR
The PSC is a valid psychosocial screening instrument, at least for this age group, and thus applicable for German-speaking countries.
Behavioral Health Screening in Urban Primary Care Settings: Construct Validity of the PSC-17
TLDR
Clinicians using the PSC-17 in urban low-income communities should recognize that the externalizing and attention problems subscales of the P SC-17 may not be valid measures of these dimensions of child behavior in this population.
Factor Analysis of the Pediatric Symptom Checklist with a Chronically Ill Pediatric Population
TLDR
The psychometric properties and factor structure of a widely used screening measure for behavioral and emotional dysfunction, the Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC), was extended to a population of chronically ill children and lend support to extending the PSC's clinical utility to tertiary care pediatric settings.
Mental Health Screening in Pediatric Practice: Factors Related to Positive Screens and the Contribution of Parental/Personal Concern
TLDR
Mental health screening can be effectively implemented in a pediatric practice through the combination of a screening tool and questions about parental/personal concern and present counseling, which can provide critical information about a child’s mental health.
The Korean Version of the Pediatric Symptom Checklist: Psychometric Properties in Korean School-aged Children
TLDR
The present results suggest that the Korean version of the pediatric symptom checklist (PSC) has good internal consistency and validity using the standard of CBCL scores.
Identification of emotional and behavior problems in obese children using Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and 17-items Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC-17)
TLDR
The PSC-17 has moderate sensitivity to screen emotional and behavior problem in obese children, according to a cross-sectional study done in May - June 2009.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 52 REFERENCES
Use of the pediatric symptom checklist in strategies to improve preventive behavioral health care.
TLDR
The study provided further support for the validity and reliability of the PSC and confirmed the results of earlier studies that found a high level of unmet needs for mental health services among this population.
Psychosocial screening in pediatric practice: identifying high-risk children.
TLDR
Results suggest that the PSC is a valid pediatric psychosocial screening instrument for multiethnic patient populations and compared to the CGAS and CBCL in terms of sensitivity and specificity.
Psychosocial Screening in Pediatric Practice: Identifying High‐Risk Children
TLDR
Results suggest that the PSC is a valid pediatric psychosocial screening instrument for multiethnic patient populations and compared to the CGAS and CBCL scores in terms of sensitivity and specificity.
Use of the Pediatric Symptom Checklist to screen for psychosocial problems in pediatric primary care: a national feasibility study.
TLDR
Use of the Pediatric Symptom Checklist offers an approach to the recognition of psychosocial dysfunction that is sufficiently consistent across groups and locales to become part of comprehensive pediatric care in virtually all outpatient settings.
The Pediatric Symptom Checklist. Support for a role in a managed care environment.
TLDR
Pediatricians should be sensitive to psychosocial dysfunction especially in single-parent and low-income families and use of the Pediatric Symptom Checklist for psychossocial screening in a managed health care delivery system could target capitated resources efficiently by providing early identification and secondary prevention of Psychosocial morbidity.
Screening 4− and 5‐Year-Old Children for Psychosocial Dysfunction: A Preliminary Study with the Pediatric Symptom Checklist
TLDR
Levels of agreement between the PSC and the Child Behavior Checklist were found to be acceptable and approximately equal to those obtained with older children, and rates of reliability were also equivalent.
Screening for Psychosocial Problems in 4-5-Year-Olds During Routine EPSDT Examinations: Validity and Reliability in a Mexican-American Sample
The effectiveness of the Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC) as a psychosocial screening measure to meet Federal Medicaid/Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment (EPSDT) requirements was
Psychopathology in pediatric primary care: the new hidden morbidity.
In a study of emotional and behavioral problems seen in children attending pediatric primary care clinics in a health maintenance organization, parents of 789 children 7 to 11 years of age completed
Screening for psychosocial dysfunction in inner-city children: further validation of the Pediatric Symptom checklist.
TLDR
Preliminary evidence is provided that the Pediatric Symptom Checklist is as valid and reliable for screening children from economically disadvantaged and minority backgrounds as it is for middle and upper middle-class populations.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...