Use of ibuprofen and risk of Parkinson disease

@article{Gao2011UseOI,
  title={Use of ibuprofen and risk of Parkinson disease},
  author={Xiang Gao and Honglei Chen and Michael A Schwarzschild and Alberto Ascherio},
  journal={Neurology},
  year={2011},
  volume={76},
  pages={863 - 869}
}
Background: Neuroinflammation may contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease (PD). Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) in general, and possibly ibuprofen in particular, has been shown to be related to lower PD risk in previous epidemiologic studies. Methods: We prospectively examined whether use of ibuprofen or other NSAIDs is associated with lower PD risk among 136,197 participants in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS… Expand
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