Use of creatine in the elderly and evidence for effects on cognitive function in young and old

@article{Rawson2011UseOC,
  title={Use of creatine in the elderly and evidence for effects on cognitive function in young and old},
  author={Eric S. Rawson and Andrew C Venezia},
  journal={Amino Acids},
  year={2011},
  volume={40},
  pages={1349-1362}
}
The ingestion of the dietary supplement creatine (about 20 g/day for 5 days or about 2 g/day for 30 days) results in increased skeletal muscle creatine and phosphocreatine. Subsequently, the performance of high-intensity exercise tasks, which rely heavily on the creatine-phosphocreatine energy system, is enhanced. The well documented benefits of creatine supplementation in young adults, including increased lean body mass, increased strength, and enhanced fatigue resistance are particularly… 
Creatine supplementation in the aging population: effects on skeletal muscle, bone and brain
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TLDR
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TLDR
The results from this meta-analysis are encouraging in supporting a role for Cr supplementation during RT in healthful aging by enhancing muscle mass gain, strength, and functional performance over RT alone; however, the limited number of studies indicates further work is needed.
Resistance Training and Co-supplementation with Creatine and Protein in Older Subjects with Frailty.
TLDR
Co-supplementation with Creatine and whey protein was well-tolerable and free of adverse events in older subjects with frailty undertaking resistance training, and showed improvements in at least two of the three functional tests, regardless of their treatments.
THE SAFETY AND EFFICACY OF CREATINE MONOHYDRATE SUPPLEMENTATION: WHAT WE HAVE LEARNED FROM THE PAST 25 YEARS OF RESEARCH
• Many studies have demonstrated that the ingestion of ~20 g/d of creatine monohydrate for 5 d is effective at maximally increasing muscle creatine. The ingestion of 3-5 g/d for about 4 wk appears to
A buffered form of creatine does not promote greater changes in muscle creatine content, body composition, or training adaptations than creatine monohydrate
TLDR
If a buffered creatine monohydrate (KA) that has been purported to promote greater creatine retention and training adaptations with fewer side effects at lower doses is more efficacious than CrM supplementation in resistance-trained individuals is determined.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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