Use of complementary or alternative medicine in a general population in Great Britain. Results from the National Omnibus survey.

@article{Thomas2004UseOC,
  title={Use of complementary or alternative medicine in a general population in Great Britain. Results from the National Omnibus survey.},
  author={Kate J. Thomas and Patricia Coleman},
  journal={Journal of public health},
  year={2004},
  volume={26 2},
  pages={
          152-7
        }
}
BACKGROUND A representative sample of the adults in England, Scotland and Wales was interviewed to estimate levels of use of complementary or alternative medicines (CAMs) and their socio-economic correlates. METHODS The Omnibus survey is a multi-purpose survey carried out in the United Kingdom by the Office for National Statistics on behalf of non-profit making organizations. The survey is carried out in 2 out of 3 months each quarter using a stratified random, probability sample of… 
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