Use of benzodiazepine and risk of cancer: A meta-analysis of observational studies.

Abstract

Several observational epidemiological studies have reported inconsistent results on the association between the use of benzodiazepine and the risk of cancer. We investigated the association by using a meta-analysis. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, and the bibliographies of relevant articles to locate additional publications in January 2016. Three evaluators independently reviewed and selected eligible studies based on predetermined selection criteria. Of 796 articles meeting our initial criteria, a total of 22 observational epidemiological studies with 18 case-control studies and 4 cohort studies were included in the final analysis. Benzodiazepine use was significantly associated with an increased risk of cancer (odds ratio [OR] or relative risk [RR] 1.19; 95% confidence interval 1.16-1.21) in a random-effects meta-analysis of all studies. Subgroup meta-analyses by various factors such as study design, type of case-control study, study region, and methodological quality of study showed consistent findings. Also, a significant dose-response relationship was observed between the use of benzodiazepine and the risk of cancer (p for trend <0.01). The current meta-analysis of observational epidemiological studies suggests that benzodiazepine use is associated with an increased risk of cancer.

DOI: 10.1002/ijc.30443

3 Figures and Tables

Cite this paper

@article{Kim2017UseOB, title={Use of benzodiazepine and risk of cancer: A meta-analysis of observational studies.}, author={Hong-Bae Kim and Seung-Kwon Myung and Yon Chul Park and Byoungjin Park}, journal={International journal of cancer}, year={2017}, volume={140 3}, pages={513-525} }