Use of a self-made sound baffle by a tree cricket

@article{PROZESKYSCHULZE1975UseOA,
  title={Use of a self-made sound baffle by a tree cricket},
  author={L. PROZESKY-SCHULZE and O. P. M. Prozesky and Frank J. Anderson and G. J. J. van der Merwe},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1975},
  volume={255},
  pages={142-143}
}
FIELD observations and sound recordings of several South African species of Oecanthidae were carried out during the summer and autumn of 1973–74 to augment studies of the acoustic behaviour of the tree cricket performed abroad1–6. We report that Oecanthus burmeisteri uses a leaf as a sound baffle to increase the intensity of its calling song by pressing its tegmina against the edges of a pear-shaped hole gnawed into the leaf.. At least two more South African chirping Oecanthus species use a… Expand
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On late summer evenings in many habitats in the eastern United States, there are twenty or more species stridulating at the same time, and the resulting din is astonishing to those unaccustomed to it. Expand
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In central Ohio nigricornis has two distinctive “song forms” which differ significantly in pulse rate and in the characteristics of the stridulatory file, and probably represent distinct species. Expand
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The state of knowledge about insect sound production and hearing with special reference to Drosophila and some larger insects is described. Expand
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