Use of Oxymetazoline in the Management of Epistaxis

@article{Krempl1995UseOO,
  title={Use of Oxymetazoline in the Management of Epistaxis},
  author={Greg A. Krempl and Allen D. Noorily},
  journal={Annals of Otology, Rhinology \& Laryngology},
  year={1995},
  volume={104},
  pages={704 - 706}
}
The purpose of this study was to determine if use of an intranasal vasoconstrictor (oxymetazoline) could be used to effectively treat epistaxis, avoiding nasal packing. The charts of 60 patients who presented to the emergency room with the diagnosis of epistaxis and who required medical management were reviewed. Sixty-five percent of these patients were successfully managed with oxymetazoline as their sole therapy. An additional 18% were managed successfully with silver nitrate cautery in… 
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