Use of Lichen as a Roosting Substrate by Perimyotis subflavus, the Tricolored Bat, in Nova Scotia

@inproceedings{Poissant2010UseOL,
  title={Use of Lichen as a Roosting Substrate by Perimyotis subflavus, the Tricolored Bat, in Nova Scotia},
  author={Joseph A. Poissant and Hugh G. Broders and Greg M. Quinn},
  year={2010}
}
Abstract: An apparently disjunct population of tricolored bats (Perimyotis subflavus) exists in southwest Nova Scotia. During the summers of 2003–2004 and 2007–2008 we trapped bats in mist nets set at a bridge over the Mersey River in Kejimkujik National Park. In total we captured 42 tricolored bats (41 female and 1 male) and fitted 32 females and the single male with radio transmitters and tracked them to their roost sites daily. Characteristics of roost sites were compared to those of… 

Summer Roosting Ecology of the Northern Yellow Bat and Tri-Colored Bat in Coastal South Carolina

Abstract - Lasiurus intermedius (Northern Yellow Bat) and Perimyotis subflavus (Tricolored Bat) are species of conservation concern in South Carolina and are threatened by loss of roosting habitat.

Evidence of Latitudinal Migration in Tri-colored Bats, Perimyotis subflavus

TLDR
It is suggested that this species' hibernation ecology makes it particularly susceptible to long winters, making migration from the northern extent of the species' range to more southern hibernacula preferable for some individuals.

New Host and Location Record for the Bat Bug Cimex adjunctus Barber 1939, with a Summary of Previous Records

TLDR
In June 2009, 14 Rafinesque’s big-eared bats (Corynorhinus rafinesquii) were collected from an abandoned house near Shepherd, San Jacinto County, Texas, where three individuals harbored bat bugs which were subsequently identified as Cimex adjunctus Barber 1939, which represents the first record of C. adjunctus from Arkansas.

Efficacy of scent‐detection dogs for locating bat roosts in trees and snags

TLDR
Although some factors limit the ability of scent detection dogs to accurately locate roosts, dogs in this study approximated the roost location to within a 30-m radius, which may be sufficient to protect these areas during management activities.

EFFECTS OF SHELTERWOOD AND PATCH CUT HARVESTS ON A POST WHITE-NOSE SYNDROME BAT COMMUNITY IN THE CUMBERLAND PLATEAU IN EASTERN KENTUCKY

of Thesis EFFECTS OF SHELTERWOOD AND PATCH CUT HARVESTS ON A POST WHITE-NOSE SYNDROME BAT COMMUNITY IN THE CUMBERLAND PLATEAU IN EASTERN KENTUCKY The impact of shelterwood and patch cuts harvests on

Bats respond negatively to increases in the amount and homogenization of agricultural land cover

Agricultural intensification has led to widespread declines in biodiversity. An important component of agricultural intensification in many regions, including eastern Ontario, is the shift from

Feasibility and pitfalls of ex situ management to mitigate the effects of an environmentally persistent pathogen

TLDR
It is concluded that ex situ management is not an appropriate tool in this case study, and would represent ineffective use of available conservation resources, however, development of captive husbandry and re-introduction methods for hibernating, insectivorous bats would contribute to the global capacity to conserve similar species.

BAT POPULATION STATUS AND ROOST SELECTION OF TRI-COLORED BATS IN THE GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK IN THE ERA OF WHITE-NOSE SYNDROME

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THE CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF FISSION-FUSION DYNAMICS IN FEMALE NORTHERN LONG-EARED BATS

TLDR
Using nanofiltration membranes for the recovery of phosphorous with a second type of technology for theovery of nitrogen is suggest to be a viable process.

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Tree Roosting by Male and Female Eastern Pipistrelles in a Forested Landscape

Abstract Little information has been published on selection of tree roosts by eastern pipistrelles (Perimyotis subflavus) in forested environments, and no radiotelemetry-based studies have been

Roost-site selection and roosting ecology of forest-dwelling bats in southern British Columbia

TLDR
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MATERNITY ROOST SITE SELECTION OF LONG-EARED MYOTIS, MYOTIS EVOTIS

Abstract Bat conservation is hindered by a lack of geographic-specific knowledge of characteristics of roost sites used by reproductive females. We examined roost selection by reproductive female

Roost Characteristics of Hoary Bats in Arkansas

ABSTRACT We radiotracked nine hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus) and characterized 12 roosts during late spring and early summer in the Ouachita Mountains of central Arkansas. Hoary bats generally

Tree-roost Characteristics of Subadult and Female Adult Evening Bats (Nycticeius humeralis) in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina

Abstract We radio-tracked 4 solitary subadult (2 male and 2 females) and 3 adult female evening bats (Nycticeius humeralis) to 7 and 14 roost trees, respectively, during the summer of 1997 on the

Selection of Summer Roosting Sites by Indiana Bats (Myotis sodalis) in Missouri

Summer roosting sites were studied at four maternity colonies of Indiana bats ( Myotis sodalis ) in northern Missouri. Colonies of Indiana bats used two types of roosts, primary and alternate, that

Selection of Roosting and Foraging Habitat by Bats in Different‐Aged Aspen Mixedwood Stands

In aspen mixedwood forests, habitats that provide roosting and foraging sites for bats likely occur in old stands and thus may be threatened by logging. To determine if bats prefer certain ages of
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