Use of Angiotensin‐Converting Enzyme Inhibitors in Patients with Heart Failure and Renal Insufficiency: How Concerned Should We Be by the Rise in Serum Creatinine?

@article{Ahmed2002UseOA,
  title={Use of Angiotensin‐Converting Enzyme Inhibitors in Patients with Heart Failure and Renal Insufficiency: How Concerned Should We Be by the Rise in Serum Creatinine?},
  author={Ali Ahmed},
  journal={Journal of the American Geriatrics Society},
  year={2002},
  volume={50}
}
  • Ali Ahmed
  • Published 1 July 2002
  • Medicine
  • Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
PURPOSE: To determine the association between the early rise in serum creatinine levels associated with the use of angiotensin‐converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) and the long‐term renoprotective properties of these drugs in patients with chronic renal insufficiency. 
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Safety of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors in Patients with Bilateral Renal Artery Stenosis Following Successful Renal Artery Stent Revascularization
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TLDR
The relationship between angiotensin‐converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor use and clinical outcomes among recently hospitalized patients with congestive heart failure and coexisting renal insufficiency is examined.
Survival Benefits of Angiotensin‐Converting Enzyme Inhibitors in Older Heart Failure Patients with Perceived Contraindications
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Factors determining angiotensin‐converting enzyme inhibitor underutilization in heart failure in a community setting
Background: Angiotensin‐converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors were underprescribed for patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) treated in the community setting in the early 1990s despite convincing
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TLDR
A strong association exists between acute increases in serum creatinine of up to 30% that stabilize within the first 2 months of ACEI therapy and long-term preservation of renal function and withdrawal of an ACEI in patients with preexisting renal insufficiency is recommended.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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