Usable gestures for blind people: understanding preference and performance

@article{Kane2011UsableGF,
  title={Usable gestures for blind people: understanding preference and performance},
  author={Shaun K. Kane and Jacob O. Wobbrock and Richard E. Ladner},
  journal={Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems},
  year={2011}
}
Despite growing awareness of the accessibility issues surrounding touch screen use by blind people, designers still face challenges when creating accessible touch screen interfaces. One major stumbling block is a lack of understanding about how blind people actually use touch screens. We conducted two user studies that compared how blind people and sighted people use touch screen gestures. First, we conducted a gesture elicitation study in which 10 blind and 10 sighted people invented gestures… 

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