Urticarial vasculitis secondary to H1N1 vaccination.

@article{Hughes2010UrticarialVS,
  title={Urticarial vasculitis secondary to H1N1 vaccination.},
  author={Rosalind Hughes and Jean‐Philippe Lacour and Bernadette Baldin and Marc Reverte and Jp Ortonne and Theirry Passeron},
  journal={Acta dermato-venereologica},
  year={2010},
  volume={90 6},
  pages={
          651-2
        }
}
The first case of a novel influenza infection was reported in Mexico in April 2009. The swH1N1 influenza A strain, which is an amalgamation of swine, bird and human influenza (1), has subsequently spread across the world, creating the first influenza pandemic since 1968. H1N1 vaccines are available as a live, attenuated mo-novalent vaccine (LAMV) for intranasal administration and as monovalent, inactivated, split-virus or subunit vaccines (MIV) for injection. The MIV is available with and… CONTINUE READING

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