Ursodeoxycholic acid or clofibrate in the treatment of non‐alcohol‐induced steatohepatitis: A pilot study

@article{Laurin1996UrsodeoxycholicAO,
  title={Ursodeoxycholic acid or clofibrate in the treatment of non‐alcohol‐induced steatohepatitis: A pilot study},
  author={J. Laurin and K. Lindor and J. Crippin and A. Gossard and G. Gores and J. Ludwig and J. Rakela and D. McGill},
  journal={Hepatology},
  year={1996},
  volume={23}
}
Non‐alcohol‐induced steatohepatitis (NASH) is characterized by elevated serum aminotransferase activities with hepatic steatosis, inflammation, and occasionally fibrosis that may progress to cirrhosis. No established treatment exists for this potentially serious disorder. Our aim was to conduct a pilot study to evaluate the safety and estimate the efficacy of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) and clofibrate in the treatment of NASH. Forty patients were diagnosed with NASH based on a compatible liver… Expand
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  • 2006
TLDR
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Treatment with HD-UDCA was safe, improved aminotransferase levels, serum fibrosis markers, and selected metabolic parameters, and there were no safety issues in this population of patients. Expand
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