Urinary isoflavonoid phytoestrogen and lignan excretion after consumption of fermented and unfermented soy products.

@article{Hutchins1995UrinaryIP,
  title={Urinary isoflavonoid phytoestrogen and lignan excretion after consumption of fermented and unfermented soy products.},
  author={Andrea M Hutchins and Joanne L Slavin and Johanna W. Lampe},
  journal={Journal of the American Dietetic Association},
  year={1995},
  volume={95 5},
  pages={
          545-51
        }
}
OBJECTIVE To compare the effects of consumption of fermented and unfermented soy products on excretion of urinary isoflavonoid phytoestrogens and lignans in healthy men. DESIGN A randomized, crossover trial consisting of two 9-day feeding periods following 5 days of baseline data collection. SUBJECTS Healthy men, aged 20 to 40 years, were recruited from the University of Minnesota Twin Cities community. Of the 22 subjects who began the study, 17 completed all feeding periods… Expand
Vegetables, fruits, and legumes: effect on urinary isoflavonoid phytoestrogen and lignan excretion.
TLDR
Urinary lignan and isoflavonoid excretion changed in response to alterations in vegetable, fruit, and legume intake under controlled dietary conditions. Expand
Urinary isoflavonoid excretion is similar after consuming soya milk and miso soup in Japanese-American women
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Recommendations favouring fermented soya foods are not justified as long as the intestinal microflora is capable of hydrolysing the isoflavone glucosides from non-fermented soya Foods. Expand
Urinary isoflavonoid excretion in humans is dose dependent at low to moderate levels of soy-protein consumption.
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The results indicate that urinary isoflavonoid excretion is dose dependent in humans at low to moderate levels of soy consumption, and that equol excreters and nonexcreters did not differ significantly between the two diet treatments. Expand
Urinary Equol Excretion with a Soy Challenge: Influence of Habitual Diet
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Dietary fiber or other components of a high-fiber diet may promote the growth and/or the activity of bacterial populations responsible for equol production in the colon, among women. Expand
Urinary isoflavone excretion in Korean adults: comparisons of fermented soybean paste and unfermented soy flour
BACKGROUND: This study compared the 24 h urinary excretion of isoflavone algycones after the consumption of fermented soybean paste or unfermented soy flour in a population of healthy Koreans (fourExpand
Bioavailability of isoflavone phytoestrogens in postmenopausal women consuming soya milk fermented with probiotic bifidobacteria
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A modest dosage ranging from 20 to 30 mg/d may provide the most bioavailable source of isoflavone, regardless of whether it is via an aglycone-rich fermented soya milk or a glucoside-rich soya Milk. Expand
Flaxseed influences urinary lignan excretion in a dose-dependent manner in postmenopausal women.
  • A. Hutchins, M. Martini, B. Olson, W. Thomas, J. Slavin
  • Medicine
  • Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
  • 2000
TLDR
Consumption of flax, a significant source of dietary estrogens, in addition to their habitual diets increased excretion of enterodiol and enterolactone, but not matairesinol, in a dose-dependent manner in this group of postmenopausal women. Expand
Urinary isoflavone kinetics: the effect of age, gender, food matrix and chemical composition
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The data suggest that the metabolism of daidzein may be altered by the chemical composition of the isoflavones ingested, and the fractional absorption of genistein is potentially different in men and women and is influenced by the food matrix and chemical composition. Expand
Urinary isoflavonoid excretion is inversely associated with the ratio of protein to dietary fibre intake in young women
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Prevalence of the Equol-Producer Phenotype and Its Relationship with Dietary Isoflavone and Serum Lipids in Healthy Chinese Adults
TLDR
Urinary equol excretion was detected in about 25% of participants under their usual dietary conditions, and their potential to produce equol was increased after the challenge, suggesting that urinary isoflavone levels may serve as a useful biomarker for is oflavone intake in populations. Expand
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TLDR
The urinary excretion of lignans was low but that of the isoflavonoids was very high and correlated with soybean-product intake, suggesting that the low mortality in breast and prostate cancer of Japanese women and men may be due to the high intake of soybean products. Expand
Daidzein is a more bioavailable soymilk isoflavone than is genistein in adult women.
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Although soybean milk isoflavones seem to be 85% degraded in the intestine, the bioavailability, especially of daidzein, may be sufficient to exert some health-protective effects. Expand
Tofu and soy drinks contain phytoestrogens.
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The content of phytoestrogens (plant compounds with weak estrogenic activity in human beings) in tofu, a commercially produced soy drink, and three soy-based formulas was determined. Expand
Effect of dietary components, including lignans and phytoestrogens, on enterohepatic circulation and liver metabolism of estrogens and on sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG).
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It is concluded that dietary macro- and micronutrients seem to play an important role in estrogen metabolism, and fiber intake and urinary excretion of lignans and phytoestrogens, and the concentration of plasma SHBG in women. Expand
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Lignan production with the in vitro method related well to the urinary lignan excretion observed in rats and humans and should be useful in the estimation of lignans production from a given diet and in the formulation of high-lignan-producing diet for the purpose of reducing the cancer risk. Expand
Metabolites of dietary (soya) isoflavones in human urine.
TLDR
Urinary excretion rates of the three isoflavones (daidzein, genistein, glycitein) over a 3-day period following soya challenge showed moderate variation, suggesting some individual variabilities in ability to deconjugate and to absorb dietary is oflavones, while some of this variability may reflect varying individual ability to ferment dietary isOflavones per se. Expand
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The concentration and distribution of isoflavones in 29 commercial soybean foods, categorized into soy ingredients, traditional and second-generation, were evaluated by high-performance liquidExpand
Nonsteroidal estrogens of dietary origin: possible roles in hormone-dependent disease.
TLDR
It is confirmed here that phytoestrogens which are abundant in dietary soya protein are converted by human gastrointestinal flora to this weak estrogen, and that some subjects are unable to either produce or excrete equol despite the challenge of a diet containing soya. Expand
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TLDR
Dietitians need to become more aware of the phytochemical content of foods and the possible effect of phytochemicals on health and disease. Expand
Diet and urinary excretion of lignans in female subjects.
TLDR
The influence of diet on the biosynthesis of this new group of compounds was investigated by comparing the urinary excretion of the principal lignan, trans-2,3-bis-(3-hydroxybenzyl) -butyrolactone (enterolactone, HBBL), in 12 omnivoric and 14 vegetarian women. Expand
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