Urinary Biomarkers of Meat Consumption

@article{Cross2011UrinaryBO,
  title={Urinary Biomarkers of Meat Consumption},
  author={Amanda J. Cross and Jacqueline M Major and Rashmi Sinha},
  journal={Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers \& Prevention},
  year={2011},
  volume={20},
  pages={1107 - 1111}
}
Background: Meat intake has been positively associated with incidence and mortality of chronic diseases, including diabetes, heart disease, and several different cancers, in observational studies by using self-report methods of dietary assessment; however, these dietary assessment methods are subject to measurement error. One method to circumvent such errors is the use of biomarkers of dietary intake, but currently there are no accepted biomarkers for meat intake. Methods: We investigated four… Expand
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