Uric acid levels in sera from patients with multiple sclerosis

@article{Drulovic2001UricAL,
  title={Uric acid levels in sera from patients with multiple sclerosis},
  author={Jelena S. Drulovic and Irena Dujmovic and Neboj{\vs}a Stojsavljevi{\'c} and Sarlota Mesaros and Slobodan Andjelkovi{\'c} and Dj. Miljkovic and Vesna Peri{\'c} and Gradimir Dragutinovi{\'c} and Jelena Marinkovi{\'c} and Zvonimir Levi{\'c} and Marija Mostarica Stojkovi{\vc}},
  journal={Journal of Neurology},
  year={2001},
  volume={248},
  pages={121-126}
}
Abstract The levels of uric acid (UA), a natural peroxynitrite scavenger, were measured in sera from 240 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and 104 sex- and age-matched control patients with other neurological diseases (OND). The mean serum UA concentration was lower in the MS than in the OND group, but the difference did not reach the level of statistical significance (P=0.068). However, the mean serum UA level from patients with active MS (202.6+67.1 μmol/l) was significantly lower than… 

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Increase of uric acid and purine compounds in biological fluids of multiple sclerosis patients.

...

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