Urchins in the meadow: paleobiological and evolutionary implications of cidaroid predation on crinoids

@inproceedings{Baumiller2008UrchinsIT,
  title={Urchins in the meadow: paleobiological and evolutionary implications of cidaroid predation on crinoids},
  author={Tomasz Baumiller and Rich Mooi and Charles G. Messing},
  booktitle={Paleobiology},
  year={2008}
}
Abstract Deep-sea submersible observations made in the Bahamas revealed interactions between the stalked crinoid Endoxocrinus parrae and the cidaroid sea urchin Calocidaris micans. The in situ observations include occurrence of cidaroids within “meadows” of sea lilies, close proximity of cidaroids to several upended isocrinids, a cidaroid perched over the distal end of the stalk of an upended isocrinid, and disarticulated crinoid cirri and columnals directly underneath a specimen of C. micans… Expand
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  • Swiss Journal of Palaeontology
  • 2014
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