Urban characteristics attributable to density-driven tie formation

@article{Pan2013UrbanCA,
  title={Urban characteristics attributable to density-driven tie formation},
  author={Wei Pan and Gourab Ghoshal and Coco Krumme and Manuel Cebrian and Alex Pentland},
  journal={Nature communications},
  year={2013},
  volume={4},
  pages={
          1961
        }
}
Motivated by empirical evidence on the interplay between geography, population density and societal interaction, we propose a generative process for the evolution of social structure in cities. Our analytical and simulation results predict both super-linear scaling of social-tie density and information contagion as a function of the population. Here we demonstrate that our model provides a robust and accurate fit for the dependency of city characteristics with city-size, ranging from individual… Expand
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