Urban Habitat Fragmentation and Genetic Population Structure of Bobcats in Coastal Southern California

@inproceedings{Ruell2012UrbanHF,
  title={Urban Habitat Fragmentation and Genetic Population Structure of Bobcats in Coastal Southern California},
  author={Emily W. Ruell and Seth P. D. Riley and Marlis R. Douglas and Michael F. Antolin and J. R. Pollinger and Jeff A. Tracey and Lisa M. Lyren and Erin E. Boydston and Robert N. Fisher and Kevin R. Crooks},
  year={2012}
}
Abstract Although habitat fragmentation is recognized as a primary threat to biodiversity, the effects of urban development on genetic population structure vary among species and landscapes and are not yet well understood. Here we use non-invasive genetic sampling to compare the effects of fragmentation by major roads and urban development on levels of dispersal, genetic diversity, and relatedness between paired bobcat populations in replicate landscapes in coastal southern California. We… 
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