Uptake and synthesis of compatible solutes as microbial stress responses to high-osmolality environments

@article{Kempf1998UptakeAS,
  title={Uptake and synthesis of compatible solutes as microbial stress responses to high-osmolality environments},
  author={Bettina Kempf and Erhard Bremer},
  journal={Archives of Microbiology},
  year={1998},
  volume={170},
  pages={319-330}
}
  • B. Kempf, E. Bremer
  • Published 29 September 1998
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Archives of Microbiology
Abstract All microorganisms possess a positive turgor, and maintenance of this outward-directed pressure is essential since it is generally considered as the driving force for cell expansion. Exposure of microorganisms to high-osmolality environments triggers rapid fluxes of cell water along the osmotic gradient out of the cell, thus causing a reduction in turgor and dehydration of the cytoplasm. To counteract the outflow of water, microorganisms increase their intracellular solute pool by… 
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TLDR
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Osmotic Stress.
TLDR
Research frontiers include the osmoadaptive remodeling of cell structure, the mechanism by which osmotic stress alters gene expression, the mechanisms by which transporters and channels detect and respond to osmosis pressure changes, the coordination of osmoregulatory programs and selection of available osmoprotectants, and the roles played by osmoreGulatory mechanisms as E. coli and Salmonella survive or thrive in their natural environments.
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