Upper bounds on the second largest prime factor of an odd perfect number

@article{Zelinsky2019UpperBO,
  title={Upper bounds on the second largest prime factor of an odd perfect number},
  author={Joshua Zelinsky},
  journal={International Journal of Number Theory},
  year={2019}
}
  • Joshua Zelinsky
  • Published 28 October 2018
  • Mathematics
  • International Journal of Number Theory
Acquaah and Konyagin showed that if [Formula: see text] is an odd perfect number with prime factorization [Formula: see text], where [Formula: see text], then one must have [Formula: see text]. Using methods similar to theirs, we show that [Formula: see text] and that [Formula: see text] We also show that if [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] are close to each other, then these bounds can be further strengthened. 
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