Upper Palaeolithic infant burials

@article{Einwgerer2006UpperPI,
  title={Upper Palaeolithic infant burials},
  author={T. Einw{\"o}gerer and Herwig Friesinger and M. H{\"a}ndel and C. neugebauer-Maresch and U. Simon and M. Teschler-Nicola},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2006},
  volume={444},
  pages={285-285}
}
Decorations on the bodies of newborns indicate that they were probably important in their community.Several adult graves from the Stone Age (Upper Palaeolithic period) have been found but child burials seem to be rare, which has prompted discussion about whether this apparently different treatment of infants could be significant. Here we describe two recently discovered infant burials from this period at Krems-Wachtberg in Lower Austria, in which the bodies were covered with red ochre and… Expand
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