Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Associated with the Use of NSAIDs

@article{Laporte2004UpperGB,
  title={Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Associated with the Use of NSAIDs},
  author={Joan-Ramon Laporte and Luisa Iba{\~n}ez and Xavier Vidal and Lourdes Vendrell and Roberto Leone},
  journal={Drug Safety},
  year={2004},
  volume={27},
  pages={411-420}
}
AbstractAim: The relative gastrointestinal toxicity of NSAIDs in normal clinical practice is unknown. The aim of this study was to estimate the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding associated with NSAIDs and analgesics, with special emphasis on those agents that have been introduced in recent years. Design: Multicentre case-control study. Patients: All incident community cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding from a gastric or duodenal lesion in patients aged >18 years of age (4309 cases… 
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AbstractBackground: The risk of upper gastrointestinal (GI) complications associated with the use of NSAIDs is a serious public health concern. The risk varies between individual NSAIDs; however,
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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SHORT- AND LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF NSAIDS ON THE GASTROINTESTINAL MUCOSA: COMPLEX ANALYSIS OF BENEFITS AND COMPLICATIONS PREVENTION.
TLDR
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