Updates in oral appliance therapy for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea

@article{Chen2012UpdatesIO,
  title={Updates in oral appliance therapy for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea},
  author={H. Chen and A. Lowe},
  journal={Sleep and Breathing},
  year={2012},
  volume={17},
  pages={473-486}
}
BackgroundObstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is increasingly being recognized by the public due to its life-threatening and low curability rate nature. Oral appliances (OAs) were introduced as a treatment option for both non-apneic snoring and OSA to maintain the patency of the upper airway during sleep by repositioning the mandible, tongue, and soft palate.ResultsOver the past decade, OAs are enthusiastically studied and concluded as a simple, silent, bed partner-friendly, less invasive, tolerable… Expand
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A 2-year mean follow-up of oral appliance therapy for severe obstructive sleep apnea: a cohort study.
TLDR
Oral appliances were found to be successful for treating for severe OSA after first-line treatment had failed and was significantly higher than in the non-user group. Expand
Mandibular advancement appliances for sleep-disordered breathing in children: A randomized crossover clinical trial.
TLDR
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TLDR
The limited available evidence suggests that mandibular advancement splint therapy for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea results in changes in craniofacial morphology that are predominantly dental in nature, specially on a long-term basis. Expand
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TLDR
Studies showed an enhancement in the quality of life in many patients who have been treated with oral appliances, and patients in general prefer oral appliances over CPAP therapy or any other treatments for OSA because of its convenience. Expand
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TLDR
Recent evidence from randomized controlled trials indicates that oral appliance therapy is effective in controlling OSA in up to 50% of patients, including some patients with more severe forms of OSA, and this is associated with a significant improvement in symptoms, including snoring and daytime sleepiness. Expand
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TLDR
These practice parameters are an update of the previously published recommendations regarding use of oral appliances in the treatment of snoring and Obstructive Sleep Apnea and research to define patient characteristics more clearly for OA acceptance, success, and adherence is needed. Expand
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Although less efficacious than CPAP for improving the polysomnographic indexes of OSA, oral appliances are generally preferred by patients, which has the potential to translate to better patient adherence and may provide an equivalent health outcome. Expand
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TLDR
The expressive success rate obtained with the treatment of different degrees of OSAS indicates that tMRAs are an additional valuable option even for cases of severe apnea in which the patient does not tolerate continuous positive airway pressure or cannot afford this treatment, a fact quite common in Brazil and other developing countries. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
OA altered upper airway morphometry towards a profile consistent with decreased propensity to collapse, which may thus have contributed to improvement of OSA. Expand
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