Update on the aetiopathogenesis of canine cranial cruciate ligament disease.

@article{Comerford2011UpdateOT,
  title={Update on the aetiopathogenesis of canine cranial cruciate ligament disease.},
  author={E. Comerford and K. Smith and K. Hayashi},
  journal={Veterinary and comparative orthopaedics and traumatology : V.C.O.T},
  year={2011},
  volume={24 2},
  pages={
          91-8
        }
}
Cranial cruciate ligament disease (CCLD) is the most common cause of hindlimb lameness in the dog, being associated with and eventually leading to stifle osteoarthritis. Canine cranial cruciate ligament disease is a gradual degeneration of the ligament extracellular matrix (ECM) leading to ligament rupture. The aetiopathogenesis of this condition is still poorly understood but several risk factors have been identified such as breed, bodyweight, gender and conformation. Recent developments in… Expand
Canine cranial cruciate ligament disease part 1 – pathophysiology
Cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) disease is the most common cause of pelvic lameness in the adult dog and typically caused by progressive ligamentous degeneration of unknown origin. Degeneration ofExpand
Elastin content is high in the canine cruciate ligament and is associated with degeneration
TLDR
Elastin is an abundant protein in CLs forming a greater proportion of the ligament ECM than previously reported and the appearance of oxytalan fibres in degenerative CL ECM may reflect an adaptive or reparative response to normal or increased loads. Expand
Degenerative changes of the cranial cruciate ligament harvested from dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture
TLDR
Deposition of COLI, the main ECM component of ligaments, decreased with increased COLIII expression in degenerated CCL tissue, which shows that the deposition of the ECM is changed in CCLR. Expand
Investigation of fibrillin microfibrils in the canine cruciate ligament in dogs with different predispositions to ligament rupture.
TLDR
The breed at low risk of CCLD exhibited a periodicity profile which may be suggestive of a repair and remodelling within the CCL, which was found to be similar for GH and SBT, with non-significant inter-breed and inter-ligament differences. Expand
Inflammatory pattern of the infrapatellar fat pad in dogs with canine cruciate ligament disease
TLDR
The present study indicates that the IFP is a potential contributory factor in the pathogenesis of CCLD, due to its inflammatory phenotype and the proximity within the stifle joint. Expand
Long-Term Outcome in Dogs After Surgical Repair of Cranial Cruciate Ligament Disease
TLDR
Although the retrospective study design and low sample size have to be acknowledged and may cause bias to the results, osteotomy techniques may off er long-term limb function that is superior to that achieved with the intracapsular technique. Expand
Aetiology and pathogenesis of cranial cruciate ligament rupture in cats by histological examination
TLDR
This study showed that differentiation of fibrocartilage in the middle of the cranial cruciate ligament is likely a physiological reaction to compressive forces and not a degenerative change associated with greater risk of rupture in advanced age. Expand
Ruptura del ligamento cruzado craneal en perros Ruptura do ligamento cruzado cranial em cães
TLDR
A brief review of the current literature related to the rupture of the cranial cruciate ligament in dogs is provided. Expand
Caudal Cruciate Ligament Rupture in an Adult Dog 8.5 Years Post Juvenile Tibial Plateau Cranial Hemiepiphysiodesis
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The cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) is responsible for counteracting cranial translation and internal rotation of the tibia relative to the femur, and the CaCL is the primary stabilizer against the caudal tibial subluxation. Expand
Variation in the Quantity of Elastic Fibres with Degeneration in Canine Cranial Cruciate Ligaments from Labrador Retrievers.
TLDR
Labrador retriever cranial cruciate ligaments had lower elastic fibre staining when compared with previous published findings in the racing greyhound, and Breed variation in the quantity of elastic fibres may reflect differing risk of cranial Cruciateligament disease. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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Canine Ovariohysterectomy and Orchiectomy Increases the Prevalence of ACL Injury
TLDR
Sterilization of either gender increased the prevalence of anterior cruciate ligament injury, suggesting a potential effect of gonadal gender on prevalence of injury of this ligament. Expand
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