Update on food allergy.

@article{Sampson2004UpdateOF,
  title={Update on food allergy.},
  author={Hugh A. Sampson},
  journal={The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology},
  year={2004},
  volume={113 5},
  pages={
          805-19; quiz 820
        }
}
  • H. Sampson
  • Published 1 May 2004
  • Medicine
  • The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology

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    The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology
  • 2001
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