Update of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR) P-2 Trial: Preventing Breast Cancer

@article{Vogel2010UpdateOT,
  title={Update of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR) P-2 Trial: Preventing Breast Cancer},
  author={V. Vogel and J. Costantino and D. Wickerham and W. Cronin and R. Cecchini and J. Atkins and T. Bevers and L. Fehrenbacher and E. Pajon and J. Wade and A. Robidoux and R. Margolese and J. James and C. Runowicz and P. Ganz and S. Reis and W. McCaskill-Stevens and L. Ford and V. Jordan and N. Wolmark},
  journal={Cancer Prevention Research},
  year={2010},
  volume={3},
  pages={696 - 706}
}
The selective estrogen-receptor modulator (SERM) tamoxifen became the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved agent for reducing breast cancer risk but did not gain wide acceptance for prevention, largely because it increased endometrial cancer and thromboembolic events. The FDA approved the SERM raloxifene for breast cancer risk reduction following its demonstrated effectiveness in preventing invasive breast cancer in the Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR). Raloxifene… Expand
Breast Cancer Prevention: An Update of the STAR Trial
  • T. Bevers
  • Medicine
  • Current treatment options in oncology
  • 2010
TLDR
This current analysis of the STAR trail provides updated results based on a median of 81 months of follow-up that raloxifene was as effective as tamoxifen at reducing breast cancer risk but with fewer side effects. Expand
Benefit/risk assessment for breast cancer chemoprevention with raloxifene or tamoxifen for women age 50 years or older.
TLDR
Raloxifene was as effective as tamoxifen in reducing the risk of invasive breast cancer in postmenopausal women and had lower risks of thromboembolic events, endometrial cancer, and cataracts but had a nonstatistically significant higher risk of noninvasive breast cancer. Expand
Carcinoma in situ outcomes in National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Breast Cancer Chemoprevention Trials.
TLDR
Although these data indicate that raloxifene offers less protection than tamoxifen for postmenopausal women who are at increased risk for both invasive and noninvasive breast cancer, the favorable risk-benefit profile for ral oxifene affords acceptable clinical reduction in the risk of in situ cancers among post menopausal women. Expand
Oral low dose and topical tamoxifen for breast cancer prevention: modern approaches for an old drug
TLDR
Findings suggest possible beneficial clinical preventive effects by low-dose tamoxifen regimens and they are supported by observational studies. Expand
Short-Term Biomarker Modulation Prevention Study of Anastrozole in Women at Increased Risk for Second Primary Breast Cancer
TLDR
The results provide support for continued evaluation of IGFBP-1 as a surrogate endpoint biomarker in prospective breast chemoprevention studies and show a significant modulation of IGF BP-1 levels with six months anastrozole. Expand
Is There a Role for Raloxifene and Tamoxifen for the Prevention of Breast Cancer
TLDR
The history, the current role and deficiencies of tamoxifen and raloxifene in the prevention of breast cancer are described and the potential of other SERMs and new approaches to hormone replacement to improve women’s health but to reduce the risk of Breast cancer are illustrated. Expand
Use of Endocrine Therapy for Breast Cancer Risk Reduction: ASCO Clinical Practice Guideline Update.
TLDR
Clinicians should not prescribe anastrozole, exemestane, or raloxifene for breast cancer risk reduction to premenopausal women, and the decision regarding choice of endocrine therapy should take into consideration age, baseline comorbidities, and adverse effect profiles. Expand
Ongoing data from the breast cancer prevention trials: opportunity for breast cancer risk reduction
TLDR
National organizations have made recommendations to use SERMs and aromatase inhibitors to reduce the risk of breast cancer in high-risk women and additional efforts should be made to increase their use in clinical practice, where the number of women needed to treat to prevent one case of Breast cancer conforms to accepted standards of preventive medicine. Expand
Gynecologic conditions in participants in the NSABP breast cancer prevention study of tamoxifen and raloxifene (STAR).
TLDR
The results suggest that tamoxifen has more of an estrogenic effect on the gynecologic reproductive organs and these effects should be considered in counseling women on options for breast cancer prevention. Expand
Risk‐reducing medication for primary breast cancer: a network meta‐analysis
TLDR
The efficacy and acceptability of single CPAs for the prevention of primary breast cancer, in unaffected women, at an above-average risk of developing breast cancer are ranked using a network meta-analysis. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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