Unusually dynamic sex roles in a fish

@article{Forsgren2004UnusuallyDS,
  title={Unusually dynamic sex roles in a fish},
  author={Elisabet Forsgren and Trond Amundsen and {\AA}sa Alexandra Borg and Jens Bjelvenmark},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2004},
  volume={429},
  pages={551-554}
}
Sex roles are typically thought of as being fixed for a given species. In most animals males compete for females, whereas the females are more reluctant to mate. Therefore sexual selection usually acts most strongly on males. This is explained by males having a higher potential reproductive rate than females, leading to more males being sexually active (a male-biased operational sex ratio). However, what determines sex roles and the strength of sexual selection is a controversial and much… 
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