Unusual allometry for sexual size dimorphism in a cichlid where males are extremely larger than females

@article{Ota2010UnusualAF,
  title={Unusual allometry for sexual size dimorphism in a cichlid where males are extremely larger than females},
  author={Kazutaka Ota and Masanori Kohda and Tetsu Sato},
  journal={Journal of Biosciences},
  year={2010},
  volume={35},
  pages={257-265}
}
When males are the larger sex, a positive allometric relationship between male and female sizes is often found across populations of a single species (i.e. Rensch’s rule). This pattern is typically explained by a sexual selection pressure on males. Here, we report that the allometric relationship was negative across populations of a shell-brooding cichlid fish Lamprologus callipterus, although males are extremely larger than females. Male L. callipterus collect and defend empty snail shells in… 
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