Untangling the Environmentalist's Paradox: Why is Human Well-Being Increasing as Ecosystem Services Degrade?

@inproceedings{RaudseppHearne2010UntanglingTE,
  title={Untangling the Environmentalist's Paradox: Why is Human Well-Being Increasing as Ecosystem Services Degrade?},
  author={C. Raudsepp-Hearne and Garry D. Peterson and Maria Teng{\"o} and E. Bennett and Tim G. Holland and Karina Benessaiah and G. MacDonald and Laura R. Pfeifer},
  year={2010}
}
Environmentalists have argued that ecological degradation will lead to declines in the well-being of people dependent on ecosystem services. The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment paradoxically found that human well-being has increased despite large global declines in most ecosystem services. We assess four explanations of these divergent trends: (1) We have measured well-being incorrectly; (2) well-being is dependent on food services, which are increasing, and not on other services that are… Expand
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