Unrequited Love: Polyphemus and Galatea in Ovid's Metamorphoses

@article{Griffin1983UnrequitedLP,
  title={Unrequited Love: Polyphemus and Galatea in Ovid's Metamorphoses},
  author={Alan H. F. Griffin},
  journal={Greece and Rome},
  year={1983},
  volume={30},
  pages={190 - 197}
}
  • A. Griffin
  • Published 1 October 1983
  • History
  • Greece and Rome
What is the cure for unrequited love? According to the Hellenistic poet Theocritus the cure is song. To illustrate this thesis Theocritus wrote two poems about the lovesick cyclops Polyphemus. Alexandrian poets were very interested in the subject of love, especially when it went wrong, and they were also keen to show off their literary knowledge and skills by borrowing and adapting ideas from their predecessors. The lovesick cyclops of Idylls 6 and 11 combined both concerns. Theocritus was able… 
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References

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Homer Odyssey 9
    Note the chiasmus at Met. 13.896 (Ads erat erat Ads)
      Polyphemus has eleven fawns and four bear-cubs as a present for Galatea in Theocritus (Id. 11.40-41). Corydon has two roes for Alexis
        300-c. 260 B.C.) was born in Sicily and later found a literary patron in Ptolemy Philadelphus at Alexandria in Egypt. 2. Idylls 6 and 11 are set in Sicily
          candidior folio nivei Galatea ligustri' {Met. 13.789). 21. ' cygni plumis et lacte coacto